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Is The Earth Heading Towards A Mass Extinction Event?

A report authored by scientists at Stanford, Princeton, and Berkeley found that vertebrates were vanishing at a rate 114 times faster than normal, which may signal the beginning of the Earth's sixth mass extinction phase.

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"We are now entering the sixth great mass extinction event, if it is allowed to continue life would take many millions of years to recover and our species itself would likely disappear early on."

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Mario Tama Kevin Winter William Thomas Cain NASA Handout
TRANSCRIPT This transcript was generated by AudioBurst technologies

This from The Independent here, a couple more before we head to our interview. Earth enters its sixth extinction phase, with many of these species including our own labeled as the walking dead. We talked a little about this last week, the planet is entering a new period of extinction, with the top scientists warning that species all over the world are essentially the walking dead, including our own. The report authored by scientists at Stanford, Princeton, and Berkeley found that vertebrates were vanishing at a rate 114 times faster than normal, researchers note that the last similar event was 65 million years ago, and of course if you watch Jurassic world for example you know what that means, that is when the dinosaurs disappeared most probably as a result of an asteroid. One of the authors told the BBC, we are now entering the sixth great mass extinction event, if it is allowed to continue life would take many millions of years to recover and our species itself would likely disappear early on. The research examined historic rates for extinction of vertebrates, finding that since 1900, so in a little more than the last 100 years, more than 400 vertebrates have disappeared, an extinction rate 100 times higher than in other non-extinction periods. There are examples of species all over the world that are essentially the walking dead, said Stanford University Professor Paul Ehrlich, he added we are sawing off the limb that we are sitting on. The research which cites climate change, pollution, and deforestation, as causes for the rapid change, note that a knock-on effect of the loss of entire ecosystems could be dire. 400 vertebrate species disappearing since 1900 the sixth extinction phase, we may be in it right now.