Aired 6 years ago on News Talk Florida 
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Health

Is Therapy Backed Up With Science?

Dr. Joy Browne discusses how some forms of therapy might not be measurable in a scientific sense, but the effectiveness of the treatment can be easy to see none the less.

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"Do I think some of the things that those books and my books talk about and that I talk about work? Yeah! Is there a scientific basis for it? Surprisingly little. Not as much as you'd like."

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Jason Bahr John Moore Andrew Toth Andrew Burton Isaac Brekken
TRANSCRIPT This transcript was generated by AudioBurst technologies

We know that therapy and medication and exercise work better than any of the three of them, all of them together work better than any of them separately. There have, there is some, there's actually a study that came out last week, believe it or not that suggested that the studies about therapy and depression were flawed because they didn't include any of the things that did'nt work, which of course means it's not science at that moment. So, and that's talking about something that's pretty well accepted and a little easier to identify, somebody buying, as you point out, a self help book, it's going to be a lot harder to track, among other things, who buys them, because the person who bought it may or may not have read it, the person who bought it may or may not have given it to somebody else, so and then you'd have to be able to have some kind of a objective criteria that says, do you feel better? Okay so that's the all stuff we don't know. Now some of the things we do know, is and I think that your word miraculous is probably one of the ones to focus on, I'm not sure, you know, miracles just mean we just can't give you a very good explanation for it. - Right. - But the idea of getting up every day and for example saying, you hear me for example, we're about to be in the season where we're going to be talking about new years resolutions and one of the things that I've been doing with my listeners for years is saying, OK a resolution by definition is something that didn't work for you. That you know I'm feeling too fat or I was smoking or I'm not spending enough time with my kids, they are almost by definition a negative situation that you're trying to improve. So I'm saying, OK well that's perfectly okay, but if you're gonna do that you need to have a basis for change and we know, change doesn't really happen when you're feeling lousy, change happens when you're feeling good. Because you gotta get the energy to change which is very difficult, from some place, so what I suggest is you talk about 3 things that are working well. And even on my program, which is certainly not a scientific way of doing things, but for example we had a caller yesterday who was talking about being really frustrated because he had stopped smoking at 3 different times in his life and was smoking again. And you could hear by the end of the conversation that he was feeling better. His voice sounded better, he sounded happier, he sounded less upset. So do I think some of the things that those books and my books talk about and that I talk about work? Yeah! Is there a scientific basis for it? Surprisingly little. Not as much as you'd like.